Category Archives: Q+

Q+ Hangout: Troels Frimodt Rønnow

Here are the details of the next Q+ hangout

Date: 28th January 2014

Time: 2pm UTC/GMT

Speaker: Troels Frimodt Rønnow (ETH Zurich)

Title: Quantum annealing on 503 qubits

Abastract: Quantum speedup refers to the advantage of quantum devices can over classical ones in solving classes of computational problems. In this talk we show how to correctly define and measure quantum speedup in experimental devices. We show how to avoid issues that might mask or fake quantum speedup. As illustration we will compare the performance of a D-Wave Two quantum annealing device on random spin glass instances to simulated classical and quantum annealers, and other classical solvers.

To watch the talk live go to http://gplus.to/qplus at the appointed hour.

To keep up to date on the latest news about Q+ hangouts you can follow us on:

or visit our website at http://qplus.burgarth.de

Q+ Hangout: Mark Wilde

Here are the details of the next Q+ hangout.

Date/time: Tue. 26th Nov. 3pm GMT/UTC

Speaker: Mark Wilde (Louisiana State University)

Title: Strong Converse Theorems in Quantum Information Theory

Abstract: One of the main goals in quantum information theory is to establish the capacity of a quantum channel for communicating various kinds of information, whether it be bits or qubits. While several communication capacities of quantum channels are now known, the characterization of capacity in many of these cases is often limited to it being a threshold that determines the rates at which reliable communication is or is not possible. While this characterization might be satisfactory for some purposes, it leaves open the possibility for a trade-off between communication rate and error probability (that is, one might think that it would be possible to send data at a higher rate by allowing for errors to occur some of the time). However, we now know that such a trade-off is not possible for many channels and capacities of interest. That is, many researchers have now established that a strong converse theorem holds for several channels and capacities, so that as soon as the communication rate exceeds capacity, it is guaranteed that the error probability converges to one in the limit of large blocklength, no matter what strategy the sender and receiver employ. These strong converse theorems strengthen the interpretation and our understanding of capacity as a very sharp dividing line between rates for which asymptotically perfect communication is possible and rates for which an error is guaranteed to occur (analogous to a phase transition in statistical physics). This Q+ talk will review much of the progress in establishing strong converse theorems for several channels and their communication capacities in quantum information theory.

Joint work with Bhaskar Roy Bardhan (LSU Baton Rouge), Manish K. Gupta (LSU Baton Rouge), Naresh Sharma (TIFR Mumbai), Dong Yang (UAB Barcelona), and Andreas Winter (UAB Barcelona).

To watch the talk live, go to http://gplus.to/qplus at the appointed hour. To stay up to date on the latest news about Q+ hangouts you can follow us on:

or visit our website http://qplus.burgarth.de

Q+ Hangout: Renato Renner

Here are the details of the next Q+ hangout.

Date/Time: 29th October 2013 2pm GMT

Speaker: Renato Renner (ETH Zurich)

Title: Does freedom of choice imply that the wave function is real?

Abstract:

The question whether the quantum-mechanical wave function is “real” has recently attracted considerable interest. More precisely, the question is whether the wave function of a system is uniquely determined by any complete description of its “physical state”. In this talk I will present a simple and self-contained proof that this is indeed the case, under an assumption that one may term “freedom of choice”. It demands that arbitrary measurements can be applied to the system, and that these can be chosen independently of all parameters available at the time of measurement (with respect to any relativistic frame). A possible interpretation of this result is that the wave function of a system is as “objective or “real as any other complete description of the system’s state.
(This is based on unpublished work in collaboration with Roger Colbeck.)

To watch the talk live go to http://gplus.to/qplus at the appointed hour.

Note that the change from daylight savings time to standard time will have happened in the UK, but not some other countries like the US and Canada. Therefore, your usual timezone calculation may be out by an hour, e.g. the talk is at 10am in East Coast US and Canada. Please check the time conversion for your location.

To keep up to date with the latest news on Q+ hangouts, you can follow us on:

or visit our website http://qplus.burgarth.de

Q+ Hangout: Steven Flammia

Here are the details of the next Q+ hangout.

Speaker: Steven Flammia (University of Sydney)

Title: Thermalization, Error-Correction, and Memory Lifetime for Ising Anyon Systems

Abstract:
We consider two-dimensional lattice models that support Ising anyonic excitations and are coupled to a thermal bath, and we propose a phenomenological model to describe the resulting short-time dynamics, including pair-creation, hopping, braiding, and fusion of anyons. By explicitly constructing topological quantum error-correcting codes for this class of system, we use our thermalization model to estimate the lifetime of quantum information stored in the code space. To decode and correct errors in these codes, we adapt several existing topological decoders to the non-Abelian setting: one based on Edmond’s perfect matching algorithm and one based on the renormalization group. These decoders provably run in polynomial time, and one of them has a provable threshold against a simple iid noise model. Using numerical simulations, we find that the error correction thresholds for these codes/decoders are comparable to similar values for the toric code (an Abelian sub-model consisting of a restricted set of allowed anyons). To our knowledge, these are the first threshold results for quantum codes without explicit Pauli algebraic structure. Joint work with Courtney Brell and Simon Burton.

To watch the talk live go to the Q+ page at the appointed hour.

To keep up to date on the latest news about Q+ hangouts you can follow us on:

or visit our website at http://qplus.burgarth.de

Q+ Hangout: Bill Wootters

Here are the details of the next Q+ hangout.

Date/time: Tuesday 18th June 2013 2pm BST/UTC+1

Speaker: Bill Wootters (Williams College)

Title: What is the origin of complex probability amplitudes?

Abstract: I begin this presentation with an attempt to explain the origin of probability amplitudes in quantum theory, but the explanation makes sense only if those amplitudes are real. This result provides motivation for studying the real-vector-space variant of quantum theory. I show how a particular model within real-vector-space quantum theory can produce the appearance of complex probability amplitudes. In this model, a special binary subsystem of the universe, called the universal rebit or “ubit,” plays the role of the complex phase factor. In a certain limit the effective theory emerging from the model mimics standard quantum theory, but if we stop short of this limit the model predicts the spontaneous decoherence of isolated systems.

To watch the talk live go to http://gplus.to/qplus at the appointed hour.

To keep up to date on the latest news about Q+ hangouts you can follow us on:

or visit our website at http://qplus.burgarth.de

Q+ Hangout: David Poulin

Here are the details of the next Q+ hangout.

Date/time: Mon. 27th May 2013 3pm BST (UTC+1)

Speaker: David Poulin (University of Sherbrooke)

Title: Tradeoffs Between Thermal and Quantum Fluctuations in 2D Quantum Memories

Abstract: Under a certain set of conditions collectively known as “local topological order”, the low energy spectrum of a system is robust to local perturbations. This has the consequence that quantum information encoded in the degenerate ground state of such a system is stable at zero temperature. On the other hand, the existence of a macroscopic energy barrier between ground states imply that information encoded in the low energy manifold is robust against thermal fluctuations. Here, we demonstrate that for local commuting projector codes, local topological order prohibits the existence of an energy barrier, which shows a tradeoff between robustness to quantum and thermal fluctuations.

To watch the talk live, go to http://gplus.to/qplus at the appointed hour. To keep up to date with the latest news about Q+ hangouts you can follow us on:

or visit our website.

Q+ Hangout: Dietrich Leibfried (NIST)

Here are the details of the next Q+ hangout. This is our “Nobel Prize” lecture. Dietrich is a long time colleague of David Wineland at NIST and will tell us about the latest research from the Ion Storage Group. Please note the unusual start time of 5pm BST(UTC+1)

To join the hangout or watch the livestream go to http://gplus.to/qplus at the appointed hour.

Date: 23rd April 2013 5pm BST(UTC+1)

Speaker: Dietrich Leibfried (NIST)

Title: Towards scalable quantum information processing and quantum simulation with trapped ions

Abstract:
Quantum information processing (QIP) and Quantum Simulation (QS) can potentially provide an exponential speedup for certain problems over the corresponding (known) algorithms on conventional computers. QIP makes use of the counter-intuitive properties of quantum mechanics, like entanglement and the superposition principle (being in more states than one simultaneously). On the way towards a useful QIP device these properties, mostly subject of thought experiments so far, will have to become a practical reality. I will discuss experiments towards Quantum Information Processing (QIP) and Quantum Simulation (QS) with trapped ions. Most requirements for QIP and QS have been demonstrated in this system, with two big challenges remaining: Improving operation fidelity and scaling up to larger numbers of qubits.

The architecture pursued at the Ion Storage Group at NIST is based on quantum information stored in long lived internal (hyperfine) states of the ions. We investigate the use of laser beams and microwave fields to induce both single-qubit rotations and multi-qubit gates mediated by the Coulomb interaction between ions. Moving ions through a multi-zone trap architecture allows for keeping the number of ions per zone small, while sympathetic cooling with a second ion species can remove energy and entropy from the system.

After a brief introduction to these elements, I will present the current status of experiments and some future perspectives for QIP and QS.

This work has been supported by IARPA, DARPA, ARO, ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

To keep up to date with the latest news and announcements about Q+ hangouts you can follow us on:

or visit our website http://qplus.burgarth.de