The Grad Student Tax
20 November 2017 | 1:15 pm

By now as you've read from Luca or Scott or PhD Comics or a variety of other sources on the dangerous changes to the tax code that passed the US House of Representatives last week. Among a number of university unfriendly policies, the tax code will eliminate the tax exemption for graduate student tuition for students supported with teaching or research duties, nearly every PhD student in STEM fields. The CRA, ACM, IEEE, AAAI, SIAM and Usenix put out a joint statement opposing this tax increase on graduate students. This is real.

Without other changes, a tax on tuition will make grad school unaffordable to most doctoral students. In computer science where potential PhD students can typically get lucrative jobs in industry, we'll certainly see a precipitous drop in those who choose to continue their studies. Universities will have to adjust by lower tuition, if finances and state law allows, and raising stipends. US government science funding will at best remain flat so in almost any scenario we'll see far fewer students pursue PhD degrees particularly in CS and STEM fields. Keep in mind we already don't come close to producing enough CS PhD students entering academia to meet the dramatically growing demand and these moves could frustrate faculty who also might head off to industry.

The current senate proposal leaves the exemption in place though no one can predict what will happen the the two bills get reconciled. In the best case scenario this bill goes the same way as the failed health care reform but republicans seem desperate to pass something major this fall. So reach out to your representatives, especially your senators, and express the need to leave in the exemption.

A Tale of Three Rankings
16 November 2017 | 2:01 pm

In the Spring of 2018 the US News and World Report should release their latest rankings of US graduate science programs including computer science. These are the most cited of the deluge of computer science rankings we see out there. The US News rankings have a long history and since they are reputation based they roughly correspond to how we see CS departments though some argue that reputation changes slowly with the quality of a department.

US News and World Report also has a new global ranking of CS departments. The US doesn't fare that well on the list and the ranking of the US programs on the global list are wildly inconsistent with the US list. What's going on?

75% of the global ranking is based on statistics from Web of Science. Web of Science captures mainly journal articles where conferences in computer science typically have a higher reputation and more selectivity. In many European and Asian universities hiring and promotion often depend heavily on publications and citations in Web of Science encouraging their professor to publish in journals thus leading to higher ranked international departments.

The CRA rightly put out a statement urging the CS community to ignore the global rankings, though I wished they made a distinction between the two different US News rankings.

I've never been a fan of using metrics to rank CS departments but there is a relatively new site, Emery Berger's Computer Science Rankings, based on the number of publications in major venues. CS Rankings passes the smell test for both their US and global lists and is relatively consistent with the US News reputation-based CS graduate rankings.

Nevertheless I hope CS Rankings will not become the main ranking system for CS departments. Departments who wish to raise their ranking would hire faculty based mainly on their ability to publish large number of papers in major conferences. Professors and students would then focus on quantity of papers and this would in the long run discourage risk-taking long-range research, as well as innovations in improving diversity or educating graduate students.

As Goodhart's Law states, "when a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure". Paradoxically CS Rankings can lead to good rankings of CS departments as long as we don't treat it as such.

Can you measure which pangrams are natural
13 November 2017 | 9:19 pm

A Pangram is a sentence that contains every letter of the alphabet

The classic is:

                                      The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

(NOTE- I had `jumped' but a reader pointed out that there was no s, and that `jumps' is the correct word)

which is only 31 letters.

I could give a pointer to lists of such, but you can do that yourself.

My concern is:

a) are there any pangrams that have actually been uttered NOT in the context of `here is a pangram'

b) are there any that really could.

That is- which pangrams are natural?  I know this is an ill defined question.

Here are some candidates for natural pangrams

1) Pack my box with five dozen liquor jugs

2) Amazingly few discotheques provide jukeboxes

3) Watch Jeopardy! Alex Trebek's fun TV quiz game

4) Cwm fjord bank glyphs vext quiz
(Okay, maybe that one is not natural as it uses archaic words. It means
``Carved symbols in a mountain hollow on the bank of an inlet irritated an
eccentric person'  Could come up in real life. NOT. It uses every letter
exactly once.)

How can you measure how natural they are?

For the Jeopardy one I've shown it to people and asked them

``What is unusual about this new slogan for the show Jeopardy?''

and nobody gets it. more important- they believe it is the new slogan.

So I leave to the reader:

I) Are the other NATURAL pangrams?

II) How would you test naturalness of such?

Pinning down `natural' is hard. I did a guest post in 2004 before I was an official co-blogger, about when a problem (a set for us) is natural, for example the set all regular expressions with squaring (see here).


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